CaliforniaHerps.com

A Guide to the Amphibians
and Reptiles of California



Identifying Salamanders Found in California - an Expanded Photo Index
This is an expanded version of the photo index that shows pictures of all of the kinds of indigenous salamanders found in California, plus one well-established non-indigenous species, with distribution maps for each salamander. Some species are highly variable in appearance, so be aware that not every possible variation of every species is shown here. Pictures of aquatic juveniles are shown here if I have them.


This large page is divided into two main sections -
Aquatic Salamanders - lunged salamanders that live on land and in water and go back into water to breed, and
Terrestrial Salamanders
- non-lunged salamanders that live and breed only on land.

You can look through all the pictures to find one that is similar to a salamander you want to identify, or you can try to determine the type of salamander you want to identify, whether it's an aquatic salamander or a terrestrial salamander, then try to determine which category within that group it might fit -

Mole Salamanders
- Ambystoma
Giant Salamanders  - Dicamptodon
Torrent Salamanders
- Rhyacotriton
Pacific Newts
- Taricha
Climbing Salamanders
- Aneides
Slender Salamanders - Batrachoseps
Ensatina - Ensatina
Web-footed Salamanders
- Hydromantes
Woodland Salamanders
- Plethodon

- then look at the pictures of the different species and subspecies. When you think you have found one that looks like the salamander you want to identify, check the range map to confirm that your salamander was found within the range of the species you have chosen. (You can enlarge a range map by clicking on it.) Then click the species link to go to the species page for more pictures and information.

If you are unable to make an identification, email me and send a picture and the location and I might be able to identify it for you.


Click on a picture for a larger view
 More information about California Salamanders




   Aquatic Salamanders - Found in water and on land

 
Adults of these species live mostly on land where they are active at night, but they also move to water during the breeding season where they lay eggs in water that hatch into small gilled fish-like larvae. The larvae live swimming in the water until they lose their gills then move onto the land to live, breathing with lungs and looking like miniature versions of the adults. Salamander larvae can be distinguished from tadpoles by the presence of gills, which are not found on frog larvae.
Occasionally, juveniles do not transform to live on land. They spend their lives living in water, breathing with gills. These neotenic adults (or paedomorphs) look like very large aquatic larvae.
Males and females of all of these species are similar enough in appearance that knowing the sex of a salamander will not help to identify a species.

 
        Mole Salamanders
- genus Ambystoma

  
Mole Salamanders live mostly underground except during rainy periods when they come above ground at night to breed and lay eggs in pools of water.
Juvenile Mole Salamanders hatch and live in pools of water until they lose their gills and move onto land.

California Tiger Salamander
Ambystoma californiense
CA Tiger Salamander CA Tiger Salamander CA Tiger Salamander CA Tiger Salamander CA Tiger Salamander CA Tiger Salamander Larva California Tiger Salamander range map
  Adult Adult Adult © Jon Hirt Adult © Spencer Riffle Larvae are aquatic.
Gills are long - reduce in size with age. Dorsal fin is on back and tail.
Historically found only in
the red areas
Northwestern Salamander
Ambystoma gracile
Northwestern Salamander Northwestern Salamander Northwestern Salamander Northwestern Salamander Northwestern Salamander Larvae Northwestern Salamander Larvae Northwestern Salamander CA Range Map
  Adult Adult Adult Adult Larvae are aquatic.
Gills are long - reduce in size with age. Dorsal fin is on back and tail.
Found only in the red area
               
  
  Long-toed Salamanders
- Ambystoma macrodactylum

An elongated toe
can help to identify
Long-toed Salamanders
Southern Long-toed Salamander Santa Cruz Long-toed Salamander          
  The fourth toe on each back foot is longer than third toe. This is not found on other salamander species in California. © Spencer Riffle          
Santa Cruz
Long-toed Salamander

Ambystoma macrodactylum croceum
Santa Cruz Long-toed Salamander Santa Cruz Long-toed Salamander Santa Cruz Long-toed Salamander Southern Long-toed Salamander Southern Long-toed Salamander range map
  Adult Adult Adult © Brad Alexander Juvenile © Jon Hirt Larvae are aquatic.
Gills are long - reduce in size with age. Dorsal fin is on back and tail.
Found in the dark blue area
(Near Monterey Bay)
Southern
Long-toed Salamander

Ambystoma macrodactylum sigillatum
Southern long-toed salamander Southern Long-toed Salamander Southern Long-toed Salamander Southern Long-toed Salamander Southern Long-toed Salamander larva Southern Long-toed Salamander larva Long-toed Salamanders California Range Map
  Adult Adult © Chad Lane Adult © William Flaxington Juvenile Larvae are aquatic.
Gills are long - reduce in size with age. Dorsal fin is on back and tail.
Found only in the red areas
               
    
  Western Tiger Salamanders are Mole Salamanders that are not indigenous to California. They have been introduced into some Calfiornia lakes and ponds. Individuals found in California are probably derived from several suspecies found across the west, which accounts for
  the various colors and patterns which can be found. Hybrids between Western Tiger Salamanders and California Tiger Salamanders are also sometimes found in areas where California Tiger Salamanders occur.

Western Tiger Salamander
Ambystoma mavortium


Barred Tiger Salamander Barred Tiger Salamander Tiger salamander Barred Tiger Salamander Blotched Tiger Salamander Arizona Tiger Salamander range map
Adult, Mono County © Adam Clause Adult Adult, Siskiyou County © Alan Barron Adult, Siskiyou County © Alan Barron Larvae are aquatic.
Gills are long - reduce in size with age. Dorsal fin is on back and tail.
Barred Tiger Salamander Barred Tiger Salamander Barred Tiger Salamander Tiger Salamander Hybrid Tiger salamander Arizona Tiger Salamander
  Adult, Kern County © William Flaxington Adult, San Diego County © Sean Kelly Adult, Lake County Hybrid with California Tiger Salamander Adult, Arizona Adult, Arizona Found in the red areas
and possibly elsewhere
               

       Giant Salamanders
- genus Dicamptodon

 
There are two species of Giant Salamanders in California. They both look alike, so use the location to help identify the species. The Coastal Giant Salamander is found north of the Mendocino County line, the California Giant Salamander is south.
Giant Salamanders lay eggs in water that hatch into gilled larvae which live at the edge of streams until they lose their gills and move onto land. Aquatic neotenic adults are not uncommon. Adults are occasionally found walking near streams in daylight.

California
Giant Salamander

Dicamptodon ensatus
CA Giant Salamander California Giant Salamander California Giant Salamander California Giant Salamander California Giant Salamander larva California Giant Salamander larva California Giant Salamander Range Map
  Adult Juvenile Adult Juvenile Larvae are aquatic.
Gills are short. Dorsal fin is on tail, not back.
Found only in the red areas
Coastal
Giant Salamander

Dicamptodon tenebrosus

Coastal Giant Salamander Coastal Giant Salamander Coastal Giant Salamander Coastal Giant Salamander neotene Coastal Giant Salamander larva Coastal Giant Salamander larva Coastal Giant Salamander Range Map
  Adult Adult Adult Aquatic neotenic adult Larvae are aquatic.
Gills are short. Dorsal fin is on tail, not back.
Found only in the red area
               

        Torrent Salamanders
- genus Rhyacotriton

 
Like the aquatic salamanders Torrent Salamanders have very small lungs and are often found immersed in streams, but they are also similar to terrestrial salamanders in that they spend time out of the water where they need to remain moist. Eggs are laid in streams where they hatch into gilled larvae that live in the water until they lose their gills and move onto land.

Southern
Torrent Salamander

Rhyacotriton variegatus
torrent salamander Southern Torrent Salamander Southern Torrent Salamander Southern Torrent Salamander Southern Torrent Salamander larva Southern Torrent Salamander larva range map
  Adult Adult Adult Adult, © Zach Lim Larvae are aquatic.
Gills are very small. Dorsal fin is on tail, not on back
Found only in the red area
               

        Pacific Newts -
genus Taricha



Pacific Newts are the salamanders that are most likely to be seen walking around in daylight. They live under surface objects on land or underground but they emerge to move to water in Winter or Spring where they change into an aquatic phase that helps them swim. They are often seen walking or in ponds during their breeding migrations. They breed and lay eggs, then leave the water to live on land where they change back into their terrestrial phase. The eggs hatch into tiny gilled larva which eventually transform and leave the water to live on land.
Except for the Red-bellied Newt, the only species that has all-black eyes, the other three species can be hard to identify. Click on this link to find more information to help with Pacific Newt identification in areas where more than one species occurs.

Rough-skinned Newt
Taricha granulosa

newt Rough-skinned Newt newt Rough-skinned Newt Rough-skinned Newt larva Rough-skinned Newt larva range map
  Terrestrial phase adult Terrestrial phase juvenile Terrestrial phase adult Aquatic phase adult Larvae are aquatic.
Stripes not present. Gills are long - reduce in size with age.
Dorsal fin is on back and tail.
Found only in the red areas
Red-bellied Newt
Taricha rivularis
Red-bellied Newt Red-bellied Newt Red-bellied Newt Red-bellied Newt Red-bellied Newt larva Red-bellied Newt larva range map

Terrestrial phase adult Unlike the other Pacific Newts which have a yellow patch in their eyes, the eyes of Red-bellied Newts are all black. Aquatic phase adult Aquatic phase adult Larvae are aquatic.
Stripes not present. Gills are long - reduce in size with age.
Dorsal fin is on back and tail.
Found only in the red area
Sierra Newt
Taricha sierrae
newt Sierra Newt Sierra Newt Sierra Newt Sierra Newt Larva Sierra Newt Larva range map
  Terrestrial phase adult Adult Terrestrial phase adult Aquatic phase adult Larvae are aquatic.
Stripes are present. Gills are long - reduce in size with age.
Dorsal fin is on back and tail.
Found only in the orange area
Coast Range Newt
Taricha torosa
California Newt California Newt California Newt California Newt Larva California Newt Larva range map
  Terrestrial phase adult Terrestrial phase adult Terrestrial phase adult Aquatic phase adult Larvae are aquatic. (left) young (right) mature
Stripes are present. Gills are long - reduce in size with age.
Dorsal fin is on back and tail.
Found only in the red areas






             

  Terrestrial Salamanders - Family Plethodontidae (Found on land, not in water)

 
The following terrestrial salamanders all live in moist places on land, emerging at night to hunt. They are rarely found active in the daytime. They are typically found under rocks, logs, and other surface objects and they are occasionally seen walking at night. They need to stay moist but they are rarely found in water since they respire through their skin instead of using lungs. They breed and lay their eggs in moist places on land, not in water like the aquatic salamanders. The young hatch fully-formed as a miniature version of the terrestrial adults, but they are sometimes colored differently than adults. Males and females of all of these species are similar enough in appearance that knowing the sex of a salamander will not help to identify a species.

 
 
        Climbing Salamanders
- genus Aneides

 
Climbing Salamanders have thick toe tips that are specially adapted to help them climb steep surfaces such as rocks and trees.

 

           Black Salamander
- Aneides flavipunctatus


Black Salamanders are found in several colors and patterns. It has been proposed that there are actually four separate species, but they do not correspond exactly to the different colors and patterns. Hatchling juveniles are often yellow or greenish in color.
(All of the Black Salamanders shown below are currently recognized one species, Aneides flavipunctatus, with the Speckled Black Salamander and the Santa Cruz Black Salamander recognized as separate subspecies.
The pictures below are separated into rows of the various forms of the species, with different colors and patterns, but they are all still recognized as the same species.)

Speckled
Black Salamander

Aneides flavipunctatus flavipunctatus

(Spotted Form)
Speckled Black Salamander Speckled Black Salamander Speckled Black Salamander black salamander Speckled Black Salamander Speckled Black Salamander foot Black Salamanders Range Map
  Adult Sub-adult Adult © Zach Lim Adult and juvenile Juvenile Black Salamanders have
rounded toe tips
Found only in the red areas
Speckled
Black Salamander


(Black Form)
Speckled Black Salamander Speckled Black Salamander Speckled Black Salamander        
  Adult Adult Juvenile        
Speckled
Black Salamander


(Frosted Form)
Speckled Black Salamander Speckled Black Salamander Speckled Black Salamander Speckled Black Salamander Speckled Black Salamander Speckled Black Salamander  
  Adult Adult Adult Sub-adult Juvenile Juvenile  
Speckled
Black Salamander


(The newly-proposed species
Shasta Black Salamander
Aneides iecanus)
Speckled Black Salamander Speckled Black Salamander Speckled Black Salamander Speckled Black Salamander Speckled Black Salamander Speckled Black Salamander  
  Adult Adult Adult © Jonathan Hakim Adult © Zach Lim Adult © Jonathan Hakim Juvenile © Mark Gary  
Speckled
Black Salamander


(The newly-proposed species Klamath Black Salamander
Aneides klamathensis)
Speckled Black Salamander Speckled Black Salamander Speckled Black Salamander Speckled Black Salamander Speckled Black Salamander Speckled Black Salamander  
  Adult Adult Adult © Alan Barron Adult Sub-adult © Alan Barron Juvenile © Alan Barron  
Santa Cruz
Black Salamander

Aneides flavipunctatus
niger

black salamander Santa Cruz Black Salamander Santa Cruz Black Salamander Santa Cruz Black Salamander Santa Cruz Black Salamanders Santa Cruz Black Salamander Black Salamanders Range Map
  Adult Adult Adult Adult © Spencer Riffle Adult and juvenile Juvenile © Zachary Lim Found only in the orange area
               

  Arboreal Salamanders can have varying amounts of spotting on the body - from very fine spots to very large ones - and varying background colors, but they are all the same species.
  Hatchling and very young juvenile Arboreal Salamanders do not look like the adults, having a very dark background with a wash of light markings, not just spots.

Arboreal Salamander
Aneides lugubris

Arboreal salamander Arboreal Salamander Arboreal Salamander Arboreal Salamander Arboreal Salamander Arboreal Salamander Arboreal Salamander Range Map
  Adult Adult Adult Adult Juvenile Hatchling © Spencer Riffle Found only in the red areas
               

  Clouded Salamanders are very similar to Wandering Salamanders in appearance and behavior, so use the range maps to help identify them where both species occur in California. Both species are typically found under the bark of fallen trees.

Clouded Salamander
Aneides ferreus
clouded salamander Clouded Salamander Clouded Salamander Clouded Salamander Clouded Salamander Clouded Salamander Clouded Salamander California Range Map
  Adult Adult Adult © William Flaxington Sub-adult Juvenile Clouded Salamanders have
squared-lff toe tips
Found only in the red area
Wandering Salamander
Aneides vagrans
wandering salamander Wandering Salamander Wandering Salamander Wandering Salamander Wandering Salamander Wandering Salamander foot Wandering Salamander Range Map
  Adult Adult Adult Sub-adult Juvenile © Alan Barron Wandering Salamanders have
squared-off toe tips.
Found only in the red area
               

       Slender Salamanders - genus Batrachoseps

 
Slender Salamanders are small worm-like salamanders with tiny legs that are sometimes not noticed.
The different species are hard to identify by appearance, so use the range maps to help identify them since in most areas only one species is found.
  
  
   Range map of all Slender Salamanders:

range map
               
Physical characteristics that
can help to identify
Slender Salamanders
California Slender Salamander toes California Slender Salamander Garden Slender Salamander Black-bellied Slender Salamander Channel Islands Slender Salamander  
  Slender Salmanders have only 4 toes on their hind feet.
All other California salamanders have
5 toes
on their hind feet.
Slender salamanders have long thin bodies. The tail can be longer that the body but the tail can also be broken off. The legs are very small and they are sometimes not seen. Slender Salamanders are sometimes mistaken for a worm or a tiny snake when the legs are not seen. In some areas of southern California two species of Slender Salamanders can be found. They can usually be identified by looking at the underside.
Left: The Garden Slender Salamander has a light underside.
Right: The Black-bellied Slender Salamander has a dark underside.
The Island Slender Salamander also has a light underside. It is found on Santa Cruz Island along with the Black-bellied Slender Salamander (left).  
Greenhorn Mountains
Slender Salamander

Batrachoseps altasierrae
greenhorn mountains slender salamander Greenhorn Mountains Slender Salamander Greenhorn Mountains Slender Salamander Greenhorn Mountains Slender Salamander Greenhorn Mountains Slender Salamander comp Greenhorn Mountains Slender Salamander range map
  Adult Adult Adult Adult Adult © Ryan Sikola Adult Found only in the red area
California
Slender Salamander

Batrachoseps attenuatus
ca slender salamander California Slender Salamander California Slender Salamander California Slender Salamander California Slender Salamander California Slender Salamander range map
  Adult Adult Adult Adult Adult Tiny Juvenile Found only in the red areas
Fairview
Slender Salamander

Batrachoseps bramei
fairview slender salamander Fairview Slender Salamander Fairview Slender Salamander Fairview Slender Salamander Fairview Slender Salamander Fairview Slender Salamander range map
  Adult Adult Adult Adult Adult Adult Found only in the red area
Inyo Mountains
Slender Salamander

Batrachoseps campi
Inyo Mountains Slender Salamander Inyo Mountains Slender Salamander Inyo Mountains Slender Salamander Inyo Mountains Slender Salamander Inyo Mountains Slender Salamander Inyo Mountains Slender Salamander range map
  Adult Adult Adult Adult © Adam Clause Adult © Adam Clause Adult and juvenile, © Ryan Sikola Found only in the red areas
Hell Hollow
Slender Salamander

Batrachoseps diabolicus

Hell Hollow Slender Salamander Hell Hollow Slender Salamander Hell Hollow Slender Salamander Hell Hollow Slender Salamander Hell Hollow Slender Salamander Hell Hollow Slender Salamander range map
  Adult Adult Adult Adult Adult Adult © Chad M. Lane Found only in the red area
San Gabriel Mountains
Slender Salamander

Batrachoseps gabrieli

San Gabriel Mountains Slender Salamander San Gabriel Mountains Slender Salamander San Gabriel Mountains Slender Salamander San Gabriel Mountains Slender Salamander San Gabriel Mountains Slender Salamander range map
  Adult Adult Adult Adult Adult Adult and Juvenile © Adam Clause Found only in the red areas
Gabilan Mountains
Slender Salamander

Batrachoseps gavilanensis
Gabilan Mountains Slender Salamander Gabilan Mountains Slender Salamander Gabilan Mountains Slender Salamander Gabilan Mountains Slender Salamander Gabilan Mountains Slender Salamander Gabilan Mountains Slender Salamander range map
  Adult Adult Adult Adult Adult Juvenile Found only in the red area
Gregarious
Slender Salamander

Batrachoseps gregarius
Gregarious Slender Salamander Gregarious Slender Salamander Gregarious Slender Salamander Gregarious Slender Salamander Gregarious Slender Salamander range map
  Adult Adult Adult Adult Adult Adult Found only in the red area
San Simeon
Slender Salamander

Batrachoseps incognitus
San Simeon Slender Salamander San Simeon Slender Salamander San Simeon Slender Salamander San Simeon Slender Salamander San Simeon Slender Salamander San Simeon Slender Salamander range map
  Adult Adult Adult © Spencer Riffle Adult © Ryan Sikola Adult © Spencer Riffle Juvenile © Ryan Sikola Found only in the red area
Sequoia
Slender Salamander

Batrachoseps kawia
Sequoia Slender Salamander Sequoia Slender Salamander Sequoia Slender Salamander Sequoia Slender Salamander Sequoia Slender Salamander range map
  Adult Adult
Adult © Brad Alexander Adult Adult Adult Found only in the red area
Santa Lucia Mountains
Slender Salamander

Batrachoseps luciae

Santa Lucia Mountains Slender Salamander Santa Lucia Mountains Slender Salamander Santa Lucia Mountains Slender Salamander Santa Lucia Mountains Slender Salamander Santa Lucia Mountains Slender Salamander Santa Lucia Mountains Slender Salamander range map
  Adult Adult Adult Adult Adult © Ryan Sikola Juvenile Found only in the red area
 
       Southern California Slender Salamander - Batrachoseps major
Desert
Slender Salamander

Batrachoseps major aridus
desert slender salamander Desert Slender Salamander       range map
  Adult © Mario Garcia-Paris Adult © Mario Garcia-Paris Adult © Arden Brame
(courtesy of Harold De Lisle.)
      Found in the bright blue area
(Isolated desert canyons in Riverside County only.)
Garden
Slender Salamander

Batrachoseps major major

slender salamander Garden Slender Salamander Garden Slender Salamander Garden Slender Salamander Garden Slender Salamander Garden Slender Salamander range map
  Adult Adult Adult Adult The underside is light in color. Adult and juvenile Found in the red and blue areas
               
Lesser
Slender Salamander

Batrachoseps minor
Lesser Slender Salamander Lesser Slender Salamander Lesser Slender Salamander Lesser Slender Salamander Lesser Slender Salamander range map
  Adult Adult © Spencer Williams Adult © Spencer Williams Adult © David Wake Adult © Ryan Sikola Adult © Spencer Riffle Found only in the red area
Black-bellied
Slender Salamander

Batrachoseps nigriventris
slender salamander Lesser Slender Salamander Lesser Slender Salamander Black-bellied Slender Salamander Black-bellied Slender Salamander Black-bellied Slender Salamander range map
  Adult Adult Adult © Ryan Sikola Adult The underside is dark in color. Adult and Juvenile Found only in the red area
Channel Islands
Slender Salamander

Batrachoseps pacificus
slender salamander Channel Islands Slender Salamander Channel Islands Slender Salamander Channel Islands Slender Salamander Channel Islands Slender Salamander Channel Islands Slender Salamander range map
  Adult Adult Adult Adult © Spencer Williams Adult The underside is light in color Found only in the red areas
(Channel Islands only)
Kings River
Slender Salamander

Batrachoseps regius

slender salamander Kings River Slender Salamander Kings River Slender Salamander Kings River Slender Salamander Kings River Slender Salamander Kings River Slender Salamander range map
  Adult Adult Adult Adult Adult Adult Found only in the red area
Relictual
Slender Salamander

Batrachoseps relictus
Relictual Slender Salamander Relictual Slender Salamander slender salamander Relictual Slender Salamander Inyo Mountains Slender Salamander Inyo Mountains Slender Salamander range map
  Adult © William Flaxington Adult © Robb Schell Adult © Brad Alexander Adult © Rob Schell Adult © Mark Gary Adult and juveniles © Noah Morales Found only in the red area
Kern Plateau
Slender Salamander

Batrachoseps robustus
slender salamander Kern Plateau Slender Salamander Kern Plateau Slender Salamander Kern Plateau Slender Salamander Kern Plateau Slender Salamander Kern Plateau Slender Salamander Kern Plateau Slender Salamander Range Map
  Adult Adult Adult Adult Adult © Noah Morales Adult Found only in the red area
Kern Canyon
Slender Salamander

Batrachoseps simatus
slender salamander Kern Canyon Slender Salamander Kern Canyon Slender Salamander Kern Canyon Slender Salamander Kern Canyon Slender Salamander Kern Canyon Slender Salamander range map
  Adult Adult Adult Adult © Ryan Sikola Adult Hatchling on U.S. ten-cent coin Found only in the red area
Tehachapi
Slender Salamander

Batrachoseps stebbinsi

slender salamander Tehachapi Slender Salamander Tehachapi Slender Salamander Tehachapi Slender Salamander Tehachapi Slender Salamander Tehachapi Slender Salamander range map
  Adult Adult Adult Adult Adult Adult © Ryan Sikola
Found only in the red area
Arguello
Slender Salamander

Batrachoseps wakei
Lesser Slender Salamander Lesser Slender Salamander     Arguello Slender Salamander range map
  Adult © Robert Hansen Adult © Robert Hansen     Found only in the tiny red area
               

        Ensatina
- Ensatina eschscholtzii


The genus Ensatina currently consists of one species - eschscholtzii - with seven different subspecies which can be identified by color and pattern and by range. (Ensatina klauberi is also recognized as a full species by some herpetologists.)

Physical characteristics that can help to identify Ensatina tailYellow-eyed Ensatina When threatened, Ensatina assume a defensive pose with their bodies raised up off the ground and their tails elevated. They release a white poisonous fluid from glands on their tail and head. Oregon Ensatina Painted Ensatinas When threatened, Ensatina assume a defensive pose with their bodies raised up off the ground and their tails elevated. They release a white poisonous fluid from glands on their tail and head.    
  Unlike other salamanders, the tail of an Ensatina is constricted at its base When threatened, Ensatina often assume a defensive stance with the legs and tails raised as they excrete a milky substance from their tail and neck.    
Yellow-blotched Ensatina
Ensatina eschscholtzii
croceater
Ensatina Yellow-blotched Ensatina Yellow-blotched Ensatina Yellow-blotched Ensatina Yellow-blotched Ensatina Yellow-blotched Ensatina Ensatina California Range Map
  Adult Adult Adult Adult Adult Juvenile Found in the dark blue areas
Monterey Ensatina
Ensatina eschscholtzii eschscholtzii
Ensatina Monterey Ensatina Monterey Ensatina Monterey Ensatina Monterey Ensatina Monterey Ensatina Ensatina California Range Map
  Adult Adult Adult Adult Adult Juvenile Found only in the purple area
Large-blotched Ensatina
Ensatina eschscholtzii
klauberi
Ensatina Large-blotched Ensatina Large-blotched Ensatina Large-blotched Ensatina Large-blotched Ensatina Large-blotched Ensatina Ensatina California Range Map
  Adult Adult Adult Adult Adult Juvenile Found in the bright blue area
Oregon Ensatina
Ensatina eschscholtzii oregonensis

(California intergrades)
Ensatina Oregon Ensatina Oregon Ensatina Oregon Ensatina Oregon Ensatina Oregon Ensatina Ensatina California Range Map
  Adult Adult Adult Adult Adult Juvenile Found only in the red area
Painted Ensatina
Ensatina eschscholtzii
picta
Ensatina Painted Ensatina Painted Ensatina Painted Ensatina Painted Ensatinas Painted Ensatina Ensatina California Range Map
  Adult Adult Adult Adult Juveniles © Alan Barron Juvenile Found only in the pink area
Sierra Nevada Ensatina
Ensatina eschscholtzii
platensis
Sierra Nevada Ensatina Sierra Nevada Ensatina Sierra Nevada Ensatina Sierra Nevada Ensatina Sierra Nevada Ensatina Ensatina California Range Map
  Adult Adult Adult Adult Adult and juvenile   Found only in the orange area
Yellow-eyed Ensatina
Ensatina eschscholtzii
xanthoptica
Ensatina Yellow-eyed Ensatina Yellow-eyed Ensatina Yellow-eyed Ensatina Yellow-eyed Ensatina Yellow-eyed Ensatina Ensatina California Range Map
  Adult Adult Adult Adult Adult without tail Juvenile Found only in the yellow areas
               

        Web-footed Salamanders - genus Hydromantes

 
Web-footed Salamanders are associated with moist rocky areas, including granite and limestone cliffs, caves, and caverns. The rear feet have slightly-webbed toes which aid in climbing steep rock surfaces. They can be easily identified by their location, but in the area around Lake Shasta there are three similar species, so be sure to check the enlarged range map.

Physical characteristics that can help to identify
Web-footed Salamanders
Limestone Salamander foot Shasta Salamander Mount Lyell Salamander foot Shasta Salamander Shasta Salamander    
  The rear feet have webbed toes Webbed toes Webbed toes The body can be flattened to
fit into narrow rock crevices
Adult in rock crack © Spencer Williams    
Limestone Salamander
Hydromantes brunus

limestone salamander Limestone Salamander Limestone Salamander Limestone Salamander Limestone Salamander Limestone Salamander range map
  Adult Adult Adult Adult Adult Juveniles are greenish yellow Found only in the red area
Mount Lyell Salamander
Hydromantes platycephalus
mount lyell salamander Mount Lyell Salamander Mount Lyell Salamander Mount Lyell Salamander Mount Lyell Salamander Mount Lyell Salamander range map
  Adult Adult Adult Adult Adult Juvenile Found only in the red area
Samwel Shasta Salamander
Hydromantes samweli
Shasta Salamander Shasta Salamander Shasta Salamander Shasta Salamander Shasta Salamander range map
  Adult Adult Adult Adult Adult and juvenile Juvenile Found only in the yellow area
Enlarged range map
Shasta Salamander
Hydromantes shastae
Shasta Salamander Shasta Salamander Shasta Salamander Shasta Salamander   range map
  Sub-adult © Spencer Riffle Adult © Spencer Riffle Sub-adult © Spencer Riffle Adult © Spencer Riffle   Found only in the orange area
Enlarged range map
Wintu Shasta Salamader
Hydromantes wintu
Shasta Salamander Shasta Salamander Shasta Salamander Shasta Salamander Shasta Salamander Shasta Salamander range map
  Adult © Spencer Williams Adult © Noah Morales Adult © Noah Morales Adult © Noah Morales Adult © Spencer Williams Juvenile © Noah Morales Found only in the red area
Enlarged range map
 

        Woodland Salamanders
- genus Plethodon


Woodland Salamanders found in California are similar in size and appearance, but their ranges are limited where they are only found in woodlands in the extreme northwest part of the state. Use the range maps to help identify them.

Scott Bar Salamander
Plethodon asupak
salamander Scott Bar Salamander Scott Bar Salamander Scott Bar Salamander Scott Bar Salamander Scott Bar Salamander range map
Adult Adult Adult Adult © Alan Barron Adult, and juvenile © Tim Burkhardt
Juveniles have reddish
stripes on the back
Found only in the red area
Dunn's Salamander
Plethodon dunni

salamander Dunn's Salamander
  Adult Adult Adult Adult Adult Juvenile © Alan Barron Found only in the red area
Del Norte Salamander
Plethodon elongatus
salamander Del Norte Salamander Del Norte Salamander Del Norte Salamander Del Norte Salamander Del Norte Salamander range map
  Adult Adult Adult Adult Adult and juvenile Juveniles Found only in the red area
Siskiyou Mountains
Salamander

Plethodon stormi
salamander Siskiyou Mountains Salamander Siskiyou Mountains Salamander Siskiyou Mountains Salamander Siskiyou Mountains Salamander Siskiyou Mountains Salamander range map
  Adult Adult Adult Adult Adult © Spencer Riffle Juvenile Found only in the red area





             










           
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